Body (Vol 2, No 2) Print Copy

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Body (Vol 2, No 2) Print Copy

20.00

Body, Vol. 2, No 2. Released: June 30th, 2017

91 pages, Booklet style: 8.5" x 5.5"

Guest editor: Dana Dinerman, CEO/Designer, Hulabelle

Contents:

Privilege by Christi Salcedo | Molting by Stori Nagal | Haus of Volta Pinups: A Photo Story | Diary of a Mastectomy and Reconstruction by Renata Gortan | Summer Styles for Survivors by Survivors | Rising From the Ashes with Tara Dunsmore and Tina Doueihi | Lemonade from Lemons: Beautiful Chest Tattoos with Starling Wickes and Mandy Giannattasio | Living with MBC: Fighting with Myself by April Doyle

PLUS: My Body, My Choice Reader Stories |Open Your Chest Yoga | Your PhD in Healing With Food | Magic Mineral Broth Recipe | Writing Prompt: Scars

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According to the American Cancer Society: It was estimated that there were more than 3.5 million women living in the US with a history of invasive breast cancer as of January 1, 2016, and an additional 246,660 women were newly diagnosed in 2016. The median age at diagnosis is 61. About 19% of breast cancers occur among women younger than age 50.

Treatment for breast cancer usually involves breast-conserving surgery (BCS) (i.e., lumpectomy/partial mastectomy, in which only cancerous tissue plus a rim of normal tissue are removed) accompanied with radiation or mastectomy (surgical removal of the breast). When BCS is appropriately used for localized or regional cancers (followed by radiation to the breast), long-term survival is the same as treatment with mastectomy alone. However, some patients require mastectomy because of tumor characteristics, such as locally advanced stage, large or multiple tumors, or because they previously received radiation, are not able to be treated with radiation due to pre-existing medical conditions, or other obstacles (e.g., limited transportation to treatment). BCS-eligible patients, however, are increasingly electing mastectomy for a variety of reasons, including reluctance to undergo radiation therapy or fear of recurrence.

Younger women (those under 40 years of age) and patients with larger and/or more aggressive tumors are more likely to undergo a mastectomy.

The number of women with early-stage disease in one breast who undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), or the removal of the unaffected breast, has also increased rapidly, from 5% of total mastectomies in 1998 to 30% in 2011. Although CPM nearly eliminates the risk of developing a new breast cancer, it does not improve long-term breast cancer survival for the majority of women and is associated with potential harms.

Among women with early stage (I or II) breast cancer, 61% undergo BCS and 36% have a mastectomy. A much smaller percentage of women with stage III disease undergo BCS (21%), while 72% have a mastectomy.

Women with metastatic disease (stage IV) most often receive radiation and/or chemotherapy without surgery (48%), while 25% receive surgery alone or in combination with other treatments and 28% of patients receive no treatment. Women who undergo mastectomy may elect to have breast reconstruction, either with a saline or silicone implant, tissue taken from elsewhere in the body, or a combination of the two. A recent large study found that 57% of women with early-stage disease who received mastectomies underwent reconstructive procedures.

 

Source: American Cancer Society. Cancer Treatment & Survivorship Facts & Figures 2016-2017. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc. 2016.