MBC: Young & Stage IV (Vol 2, No 4) Print Copy

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MBC: Young & Stage IV (Vol 2, No 4) Print Copy

20.00

MBC: Young & Stage IV, Vol 2, No 4. Released: October 30th, 2017

91 pages, Booklet style: 8.5" x 5.5"

Contents:

Just Fine: A Poem by Kisha Lee Hendrix | Fighting for a Diagnosis by Faith Kosmack | Flat at Last: A Photo Story by Chiara D'Agostino | Living a Fulfilling Life Despite MBC by Rebecca Hall Dickson | Why Pinktober Makes Me Want to Puke by Kisha Lee Hendrix | Above All, I Choose Joy by Katie Edick | S-E-X by Krista Curley | Lice Doesn't Care If You Have Cancer by Melanie Masterson | I am Clear, Not Cured by Dana Dinerman | Rising From the Ashes with Ginger Johnson | Final Thoughts on MBC: 2nd Annual Stage IV Stampede by Beth Fairchild and The Emotional Whiplash of My Wife's MBC by Kevin Hislop

PLUS: Reader Stories | Love Thy Spine Yoga | Feeling the Chaos? Food Can Help Your Mood | Triple Brittle Recipe |  Writing Prompt: The One Thing

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1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer. 1 in 3 of those with breast cancer will develop metastatic breast cancer. Despite the high numbers, not a lot of money is spent by the major awareness campaigns on funding research to develop new treatments for metastatic breast cancer. In fact, there have been very few advances since my grandmother died, and the prognosis today is no different than it was then. The day my grandmother died, approximately 112 other men and women also died of MBC. That is the case today as well.

So, what can we do? We can shed light on this dark corner of breast cancer. We can let these women know we see them, we hear them. We can let their families know we support them.

We can let their families know we support them. We can be diligent with our own health, and take our concerns to our doctors so that metastatic disease is caught early. We can fund raise and donate to organizations like METAvivor, METUP.org and the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network.

In creating this issue, I had two goals: 1) to make early stagers aware of some of our MBC counterparts and show they are “just like us” in so many ways; going to work, caring for children, etc. And to also show the layer of complexity that living with cancer brings to every day. And 2) I wanted to create a resource for other MBC women to see through the words of others that they are not alone.

We'll begin with Kisha Lee Hendrix and her poem, “Just Fine” about the internal struggle she faces in telling people how she really is versus the pleasantries that we've all come to expect. Kisha and Faith Kosmack will both talk about why the myth of early detection and mammograms to save lives is dangerous and disheartening.

Our cover model is Chiara D'Agostino. Maybe you've been seeing her around your social networks lately. She and many young survivors who opted against breast reconstructive surgery were featured in Oprah's O Magazine this October. Chiara is relatively new to modeling. She took it up after her first diagnosis, when her hair grew back in after chemo grey and curly. Read more about Chiara's story in “Flat at Last.”

When she was first diagnosed with breast cancer, Rebecca Hall Dickson, was in school to become a horse veterinarian. Cancer treatments forced her out of grad school and home to her parents' house. She changed careers and started a writing and editing business. Then the brain mets came and she struggled in her work. Now she is beginning a third chapter in her life of writing her cancer story. Recently one short story was turned into a film called “bare.”

Katie Edick and Krista Curley bring to this issue advice to their fellow MBC sisters on learning to live with MBC and it's side effects, and Dana Dinerman has some advice for everyone on the language we use to talk about the time between diagnosis and recurrence.

Melanie Masterson reminds us that parenting with cancer is not only tough but lice does not take the Cancer Card. Finally, Beth Fairchild gives us an update from the 2nd Annual Stage IV Stampede on Washington and a husband, Kevin Hislop, gives a glimpse from the caregiver/partner/husband side of the equation. 

It's not easy to know how to help. Please know, however, by simply reading this issue of WILDFIRE – 100% MBC generated! – you are doing something tremendous and real for true breast cancer awareness. Tell others about these women. Let them be invisible no more.

And if that wasn’t enough, 10 young women share “What I Wish The World Knew About MBC” in our Readers Stories column. These women range from their 20s to early 40s, all Stage IV, some diagnosed de novo others diagnosed after a metastatic recurrence.