BODY (June/July '19) Print Copy

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BODY (June/July '19) Print Copy

25.00

BODY, Vol 4, No 3.  Digital Release: June 1, 2019; First Mailing: June 7-14, 2019, 91 pages

Cover model: Stori Nagel

Contents:

Tears in the Shower a poem by Tina Conrad | Each Body Part Has a Story to Tell by Shelley Moreno | It’s About Identity, Not Vanity a story about Beth Fairchild by Christine Corrigan | Lines and Curves a photo story by Melissa Jansen | Coming to Terms With This Body by Melissa Blanchenay | Pink is More a poem by Rosanne Feder Carter | Getting Something Off My Chest: An Explant Tale by Gina LaPapa | What’s in a Bra? by Keira Kotler | Grace by a photo story by Charise Isis | Previvor Perspective: The Lengths We Go to Heal by Kristen Carbone | Living with MBC: Betrayed, Broken and Blessed by Ann Camden

PLUS: The Only Opinion That Matters: Reader Stories | Release: Yoga | Protein is Primary: Nutrition | Italian White Bean Salad: Recipe |  Tell Your Story: My Life, As Told By My Body

Additional Contributors: Becky Adelson, Stephanie Arnold, Irina Brooke, Beatrice Compagnon, Allyson Crow, Jill Curtis, Ashley Elliott, Stephanie Hodges, Marissa Holzer, Susan Perez, Jocelyn, Shannon L., Sara Kelly, Colette Hoang, Hannah Tomlinson

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With some other cancers, surgery choices during treatment are less than obvious – even invisible -- to the general public. They happen beneath the surface, deep within the body. We may see the effects of, say, pancreas surgery, on the survivor’s health, but we don’t see the pancreas itself. With breast cancer, this is different. Breast surgery happens on the surface of the body. While it is of course possible to pass as “normal” after breast surgery, it isn’t as easy as it sounds. Even dressing implants takes trial and error and adjustment. No matter your breast surgery decision, your clothing choices might be forever impacted by this one diagnosis. And clothing is just the tip of the iceberg.

Breast cancer is a very physically obvious diagnosis in that it often involves the amputation or modification of a very visible part of the body – a body part that is often unapologetically part of the public gaze, a body part that can have a big impact on how a person defines herself from a young age. For this issue’s theme, I selected cover model Stori Nagel with this very thought in mind. Stori faced breast cancer herself and underwent a mastectomy with reconstruction. She then went on to create a business around shooting stunning photographs that help women see themselves as beautiful and whole after breast cancer. Stori’s “survivor pinup” style calendars combine gorgeous young survivors from all over the US with talented photographers and smoking hot rod cars, placing Stori squarely at the forefront of a movement to restore body positivity to survivors. And it’s working! (Learn more at HausofVolta.org.)

Within this issue you’ll see all sorts of scars and read all sorts of body-based stories from lumpectomies to mastectomies to implants to explants to living flat on one side to living flat all the way across. There is no one way to do breast cancer, and similarly there is no one way to do breast surgery – and as you’ll discover here, there is also no reason to live with results that aren’t entirely to your liking either. That’s the real magic of finding your tribe: as you read this issue, you might find yourself thinking, “I didn’t know that was possible!” or “She looks like me!”

Happy reading! ~April